Opinions, Writing

Constantine and the Priests

This story is old, yet few know the tale, of the divinity of Christ and the day it began.

Read to the end and surprised you may be for few know the way in which it all came to be.


The Emperor heard stories, of a prophet long gone, his followers still present, and their numbers quite strong.

He summoned the priests for he was curious to see, who still followed this man from Nazareth and Galilee.

An audience was had, and the Emperor did learn that the priests of this man, were cause for concern. The Emperor, a pagan, many gods he believed, but these priests followed one, which they divided into three.

The priests warned the Emperor, the Roman, Constantine, that he must no longer be a pagan, and get baptized in the sea.

Constantine was no fool and the future you see, included these priests and what they believed it to be. But the religions were many and what each chose to believe, he left to the citizen, to decide how to be.

The priests were not pleased, only one God need there be. All symbols of others must be thrown in the sea. All people must change, for our numbers are great, or your rule as the Emperor, will suffer ill fate.

Constantine listened carefully, as great Emperor’s do, and saw the advantage in one religion over two. He could control these priests and watch what they do, while they keep the people in line, for fear of heavenly ruin.

A gathering was needed, and he called all to meet, in a city called Nicaea, which is down near the sea.

He invited all religions, to come seek accord, to agree on one thing; the one written word.

Gathered here by one, a mighty Emperor was he, but the priests took control and said now what will be. They spoke of one book, one religion to be, and of one God who was also divided into three. They warned all the others of heresy and hate, for they must now all agree on the rules of their new faith.

A Prophet no more, his divinity now known, Jesus and the trinity; Father, Son, Holy Ghost. The day he arose, now holy indeed, the date of his birth, now celebrated with glee. Sixty-six writings, now law, for those who believe, and hell and damnation for all who don’t agree.

He must protect pagan souls, from hell’s fury you see, by converting his religion to what the priests say it shall be. His motives not pure, but for the greater need, no longer a pagan was Constantine thought to be.

With his kingdom at risk and not a god to be seen, pragmatic he was and must continue to be. The Emperor agreed and many suffered that day, for if they differed in belief, they were then driven away.

Heresy was charged upon those godless few, who offered their thoughts about different religious views.

To the hills they did flee, the “heretics” en mass, all those who disagreed, with the priests decided path.

Their writings erased, but their faith still intact, they were forced deep in the caves, where they hid from the past. Their future now sealed, they wrote in the dark and buried their writings in large clay covered pots.

The priests were quite pleased, and all formed a pact, they would spread to world, this new religion as fact. All people would follow or suffer their fate as their prophet became the son of God, on that very date.

Constantine won the battle, though the priests couldn’t see, thought to be Christian, but a pagan remained he. His throne remained strong, and he did as he pleased, for he reined in those priests, a truly difficult task, indeed.


Opinions, Writing

Divine Inspiration?

It’s been a tough couple of days. I feel adrift which is an odd feeling for me as I usually stay “my version” of focused. I don’t believe that positive words or statements solve problems, although they may bring a needed momentary distraction. A motivational speaker would hang himself in frustration trying to “lift me up”.

I am a fixer; identify said problem, create solution and then work the problem. But not today. I’m a bit farther down the rabbit hole than usual. I have too many questions that I can’t quite answer and that brings frustration. I am not at peace and I’m not sure why.  Today, I need solutions.

I once asked the pastor of a church why he felt the bible had the answers to life’s questions. He replied, “because it’s divinely inspired”. I was about ten years old at the time and that answer has always bothered me. It bothers me more today as I could really use a book with all of “the answers”. I would love the bible to be the answer to my problem but divine inspiration sounds too broad a qualification to rely on the writers word alone.

What is it to be Divinely Inspired?  The dictionary defines it as “a concept of a supernatural force, typically a deity, causing a person or people to experience a creative desire”. That sounds simple enough. Perhaps if I was divinely inspired, I could focus and make the hard decisions necessary to bring clarity to my world.

Wait a minute, sixty-six “books” all by different authors who were divinely inspired?  What about Dante, Milton or even Joseph Smith. They all wrote of heaven and hell. The argument could be made that they too were divinely inspired.  Inferno, Paradise Lost and the Book of Mormon, respectively, all contain the writer or writer’s version of  heaven/hell, what’s considered right or wrong and offer suggestions on how to bring your life back into alignment.

I was in the shower this morning thinking of where to find answers; the Bible, Plato or even “Hey Siri”, when I decided to write of my internal conflict. Was it divinely inspired? I did think of God, multiple times, but it’s probably a stretch to say that it was divine. I’m suddenly feeling very alone in this world as it seems that the answers to life’s problems are actually the written thoughts of men and women of history who have a questionable pedigree for offering advice to future generations. In other words, if you’re a “religious” person, I imagine that you are divinely inspired every day.

So for the future’s sake, please watch what you write as today’s snippet’s of wisdom may become a chapter in tomorrow’s Bible.

I’ve also come to the conclusion that most of the answers to our questions lie within the passage of time and not within the written muses of man.